Weblog/Journal

Weblog/Journal
Weblog/Journal2018-05-09T15:34:13+00:00

The Richard Flint photography blog was started in February 2007 as a website for new images, website and podcast links, reviews and articles covering a broad range of photographers and photography.

The blog contains news, website and podcast links, photo features, photographer profiles, etc. While the photography blog may cover on a wide variety of photographic topics, its main focus is on the processes of image making from Wet Plate Collodian right through to the most recent digital multimedia, the photography itself and the photographers who make those fantastic images. The focus is on the image itself and not the camera used to get it.

Subscribing to the Richard Flint Photography blog is easy! You can subscribe to the blog by adding the RSS Feed to a feedreader such as Feedly or Feedreader. Another easy way to subscribe is by signing up to the photography blog’s E-mail updates that are delivered directly to your E-mail inbox. You can unsubscribe from the E-mail update service at any time. Just enter your email address into the sign up forms located in the sidebar on the blog websites.

Visit the photography blog website at:- https://www.richflintphoto.blogspot.co.uk

A second photo blog called Darker Skies was launched in August 2009 and is a more personal, informal blog. It’s a photography scrapbook, a mobile blog for when I’m out and about, home for the podcast links page and a place for occasional musings, ramblings and observations on photography/world. The Darker Skies site can be found at https://darkerskies.wordpress.com

The Darker Skies RSS Feed can be found at http://feeds.feedburner.com/DarkerSkies

This page displays four of the most recent posts from both of the blogs mentioned above.

 


The Richard Flint Photography Blog

Launched in February 2007, the Richard Flint Photography blog has a large archive of posts covering classic and contemporary photography, influential photographer profiles, links, reviews and more.


It certainly doesn't seem like four years since i wrote a couple of posts about the film Performance, a film that still intrigues me... and others it seems. Since then, the posts have become some of the most commented and read on the blog.

While i was moving through the internet recently i came across some interesting articles and a video about the photographs taken by Cecil Beaton for the film's publicity. Beaton ended up being paid by Sandy Lieberson, Performance's producer, because Warner Brothers would not pay the bill.

The images were part of an exhibition by Sotheby's in 2016. Sadly the online images only appear to show the 'names' in Performance which is a shame. The excellent portrait above of Michèle Breton certainly looks as though it was taken by Cecil Beaton though at the moment i can't confirm it.

The links can be found below


Documenting Decadence and Debauchery – Performance by Cecil Beaton  (Short Film)

Performance by Cecil Beaton
Posted: February 6, 2018, 1:01 pm

It's been a long time since i last saw this BBC2 programme on Tim Page. I'd be around 13 year of age, off school ill with some bug or another, and that summer i'd just got my first camera - a 126 Hamimex 88x -  from a chemist shop on the high street in Conwy, North Wales. The journey had begun. The shop is still there. I still have my first camera too.

Certain scenes from Mentioned in Dispatches were burned into my head. Page going through his slides and explaining the story behind them is one scene that made me realise that photography was not just about landscapes and holidays, it could inform and educate and i loved the power the images had. The fact that Page was still visibly affected by his head injuries received in 1969 was also something i remembered vividly. There was a cost to taking the images.

The photography of the Vietnam war still fascinates me now. Tim's star has waned over the years as he dropped down my table of favourite photographers. He was good... others were better. I've come to prefer the work of other photographers who captured the war without the rock n' roll attitude of Page. The photojournalist, played by Dennis Hopper, in Apocalypse Now was alleged to have been based on Tim Page. I much prefer the quiet professional attitude of Larry Burrows.

It is good to see this film again though. Amazing what the mix of a Vietnam war photographer documentary and a chemist shop in North Wales can do.

Posted: October 18, 2017, 5:36 pm
William Henry Fox Talbot, The Open Door, 1843
If you are looking to brush up on your early photography history then a podcast available on the BBC website might just be of interest.

Back in July, the BBC Radio 4 show 'In Our Time' recorded a 45 minute programme where the topic of the invention of photography was discussed by an expert  panel. The lives and work of Louis Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot are talked about in some depth along with the effect that early photography had on society. The various early photography processes, many of which used toxic ingredients that caused ill health for the pioneer photographers, are also discussed in some detail.

The podcast description on the website states:-

'Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the development of photography in the 1830s, when techniques for 'drawing with light' evolved to the stage where, in 1839, both Louis Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot made claims for its invention. These followed the development of the camera obscura, and experiments by such as Thomas Wedgwood and Nicéphore Niépce, and led to rapid changes in the 1840s as more people captured images with the daguerreotype and calotype. These new techniques changed the aesthetics of the age and, before long, inspired claims that painting was now dead.'

It wasn't surprising to find out that early photography was a pursuit of wealthy gentlemen. Photography in the 19th century was an extremely expensive and time consuming business. Even having your photograph taken by the early 'pro photographers' was an expensive luxury few could afford - 300 guineas was charged for a portrait (One Guinea is £ 1.05p) taking it well beyond the reach of the average person.

The podcast is available to stream via the BBC site and there is also a MP3 download which means that anyone outside of the UK should be able to access the programme.

The Invention of Photography pocast can be found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07j699g
Posted: September 15, 2016, 4:48 pm
This is the last letter of a Syrian photographer and activist who chose to stay in Aleppo. #aleppo #aleppoceasefire pic.twitter.com/F25HcGOatz
— Channel 4 News (@Channel4News) September 9, 2016
I re-tweeted this video a few days ago on Twitter but it is such a sad, touching and emotive film by Channel 4 news (UK) that i will add it here too.

Shamel Al-Ahmad, a Syrian photographer and activist who was killed along with his wife, documented the atrocities in his city of Aleppo.

The experiences and feelings reflected in the letter not only speak for Shamel but also portray what many Syrians have been enduring over the years of war within Syria.
Posted: September 12, 2016, 12:06 pm

The Darker Skies Photography Blog

A photography scrapbook, mobile photo blog... with occasional musings on photography.

I’m currently going through my Scotland images and came across this one taken in 2013. It certainly lives up to the Darker Skies name!

The tree has appeared in a number of my photographs including the one below that has been used as my twitter header image, on and off, since 2012.  I have to say that i’m rather fond of that little tree.

Both photographs were taken at a location near Dornie, Highlands of Scotland.

Posted: May 14, 2018, 5:08 pm

cowgate_edinburgh_bw

A colour version of this image, taken in Cowgate in the atmospheric old town area of Edinburgh, was posted on Instagram a couple of days ago, but i rather like the black and white version too.

One thing i didn’t notice at the time was the CCTV camera mounted on the pole! Looks like I myself was on camera  later when i walked through on my way to the Grass Market.

Posted: February 22, 2018, 10:02 am

My online presence is going through a bit of a rethink at the moment and one element of this includes the Darker Skies domain name that has been running on this website for a number of years.

To be honest, I’ve never really taken to the darker-skies.com domain name so I’ve decided to get rid of it after a a lot of thinking. I think a new Darker Skies related domain name is needed – something that fits the blog better. Time to put my thinking cap on!

Next year i will be developing this site further and to do a thorough job the domain needs to go. The blog, however will remain and can be accessed through its regular WordPress address of www.darkerskies.wordpress.com

 

Posted: November 12, 2017, 1:21 pm

Sterling Castle is one of the most impressive landmarks in Scotland and one that i’d passed for quite a few years without stopping for a closer look.  Fortunately i managed to get that closer look last weekend and both the castle and the views were fantastic.

Sterling sits in the central Scotland and has played a key role in shaping the country over the years. It’s strategic position, combined with the near impregnability of the castle, has caused invading armies many problems over the years. Often they would bypass it rather than try and take it.

The visibility was fantastic on the Sunday i visited. The cold November air was beautifully clear enabling visitors to see the mountains, located 30 or 40 miles away near Tyndrum, at the edge of Stirlingshire. A sprinkle of snow could be seen on the peaks.

One thing that did surprise me during my castle visit was the number of tourists, though i suppose that the tourism season never really stops now. I’ve always loved the reactions and behaviour of those on holiday. We all do it, but in the social media age we seem to need to prove, more than ever, that we have visited a location. The selfie stick must be the ultimate symbol of that desire. The postcard, at one time a critical part of  communicating holiday news, has been dying over the years due to social media, to the point that Salmon postcards,  who  have been publishing postcards and calendars since 1880, are to close after over 100 years of trading.

Coach tours are my favourite tourism activity to watch though. The large scale and yet fleeting visits they make are popular, seem to only give a tantalising taste of the location.  People seem to love the convenience though, even though there doesn’t appear to be the time to stand and soak in the place. Two coach tours pulled up below the castle and i took the image below. While the castle appears to be the main focus of attention, the field also contained Highland cattle that also got their photo taken. Highland cows do love having their picture though 🙂

Note the photographers who have climbed over a gate to get a clearer view.

The image of the Wallace Monument has to be my favourite from the visit. The tower stands on the Abbey Craig from which William Wallace was said to have watched the gathering of the army of King Edward I of England, just before the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. The tower also has a great view looking back at Sterling Castle, so the next visit will probably include a climb up the Wallace Monument to see the view.

The Autumnal colours are an added bonus along with the clear visibility. The light in the summer can be wonderful but it can also bring some atmospheric conditions that can hamper the photographer . The colder air, combined with the late autumn light, really helped capture  the magnificent views from the castle walls.

Posted: November 8, 2017, 6:33 pm

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