street photography

Tag: street photography

From the Archive: The Climbing Photographer

By |2018-08-17T22:03:38+00:00August 17th, 2018|Categories: The Test Strip Photoblog|Tags: , , , , , , |

A man climbing on a gate and fence to photograph two highland cows  at Trossachs Wollen Mill, Kilmahog near Callander in Perthshire, Scotland

After the rather serious tone of last month’s archive post, i thought this month would have a little photo humour from 2013. The photograph, shot using an iPhone 3GS, is of an over keen photographer trying to get a clear shot of Hamish the Highland Bull. His discarded walking stick rests against the fence.

This photo was taken at the Trossachs Wollen Mill in Kilmahog near Callander, Perthshire during a trip up to the Highlands of Scotland in September 2013. The rather adventurous photographer was part of a coach tour and had decided that a bit of elevation was needed to get a good shot of Hamish the Highland bull. It took him a few, rather unsteady attempts, to finally get himself in place but he eventually got his photos. The advantages of climbing up didn’t actually appear that great to me.

The town of Callander is worth mentioning. The small Scottish town is on the eastern gateway to the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park and on the edge of the Highlands. Callander is often referred to as ‘the gateway to the Highlands’. As such it’s a popular town, busy with tourists either visiting Callander or making their way to the Highlands. I stayed overnight in 2014 and had an enjoyable but brief explore down by the River Teith. After Callander, you start the atmospheric climb up into the mountains of the Highlands.

A group of people looking at a Highland cow at Trossachs Wollen Mill, Kilmahog near Callander in Perthshire, Scotland
Not Hamish! A Highland cow with fans – Trossach Wollen Mill at Kilmahog, Scotland

A mile up the road from Callander,  the Trossachs Wollen Mill provides another welcome rest stop oasis for the weary traveller. Whether heading to or coming back from the Highlands, it’s used by coach tours, cars and bikers alike. It’s perfectly placed as a stop to stretch the legs, get some food and plan the next part of your journey. The Woollon Mill features a very busy restaurant and excellent gift shop packed full of Scottish souvenirs. The headline act, however, has to be the very popular, hairy and iconic highland cattle.

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Hamish the Highland cow

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Hamish the Highland bull was undoubtedly the star and most likely, the most photographed bull on the planet! He’d even pose for you! Seeing coach tours of people trying to photograph the superstar bull was funny, if slightly surreal experience. The lengths that people would go to always surprised me – the climbing photographer being a good example! When you think about it, there must be thousands of photographs of Hamish all over the world!

Sadly Hamish died in 2014 at the very grand age of almost 23. He was, apparently, the oldest bull in the UK and the second oldest in the world. The average lifespan is around 14 years. The Trossachs Wollen Mill’s other Highland cattle, Honey and Hamish Dubh, a black Highland Bull, carry on the good work.

From the Archive: The Sunbather

By |2018-06-14T16:07:32+00:00June 15th, 2018|Categories: The Test Strip Photoblog|Tags: , , , , , , |

No matter how many times i look at this photo, i still can’t believe that the man was comfortable lying on that pebble beach. He did seem to be enjoying soaking up some rays.

This image was taken on the sea front at Sheringham in Norfolk around 2008. Walking along the sea front, i could see this chap sunbathing from quite a way off and I just hoped that he would stay there until i could get there… AND get the photograph. Fortunately he didn’t move even though he was literally just a couple of yards from the sea front path with people walking by. No one paid him the slightest bit of notice.

As luck would have it, a bench was located directly across from where my sunbather lay that provided a place to sit and a lower viewpoint for the photography. The resulting image is one of my favourites from the Norfolk Project combining a surreal moment with some humour. On the return journey, after visiting the lifeboat station at the end of Sheringham’s sea front, i noticed that he’d gone. I suspect he was waiting for his wife to return from town.

The 6×6 format was used a lot in the Norfolk Project, mostly in a landscape role, but I also found it good for street images like this one. I would often remove the prism finder and look as though i was cleaning the camera – then focus and get the image. I imagine most people thought i couldn’t take a photo with a piece of the camera missing!

The camera was a Bronica SQAi using a 80mm lens. Film stock was Ilford FP4. Sadly i haven’t shot much 6×6 in recent years. I think it’s time to revisit the 6×6 format again sometime soon.

More images from the Norfolk Project can be found HERE.

Edinburgh: Seven Hills

By |2018-04-08T16:28:22+00:00April 8th, 2018|Categories: Featured Gallery, Portfolio Galleries|Tags: , , , , , , |



“Edinburgh isn’t so much a city, more a way of life… I doubt I’ll ever tire of exploring Edinburgh, on foot or in print.” Ian Rankin

‘in eden Edinburgh, centred on the rock
our city with your seven hills and heavens’
To Edinburgh’ by Valerie Gills

Edinburgh is one of Britain’s most beautiful cities, ‘a dream in masonary and living rock’ perched upon ancient crags, with the medieval maze of the Old Town gazing across verdant gardens to the Georgian elegance of the New Town.

The description above comes from a guidebook but beautifully sums up the appeal of visiting Edinburgh. It is, and will probably always remain, one of my favourite cities in the UK and I’m fortunate that it is only around 1hr 30 mins train ride away from where i live. Close enough for a good day trip out.

The gallery includes quite a lot of candid street photography, an area of photography i’d like to explore more, with the bus commuter images being my favourites. The images were taken in the rush hour from the window of the apartment i was staying in on Princes Street where traffic lights regularly stops bus traffic – cars are not allowed along the street. The harsh light from the bus and other sources just adds to the isolation.

The level of detachment from the other passengers fascinated me. The passengers seems to care little for interaction with other passengers, with mobile phones, mp3 players, Kindle books, newspapers or just staring out the window helping to pass the time on the journey. Surrounded by people, and yet acknowledging no one, they continue on their journey home. It’s something i’d like to explore further and I certainly intend doing more street photography of the bus commuters at a later date.

Calton Hill provided quite a few good images when i visited one icy afternoon. The wind cut through you like a knife but the tourists were there in droves taking selfies or admiring the Edinburgh landscape.  The National Monument of Scotland especially seems to draw quite a few people for family photographs and photos for Facebook. My visit to Calton Hill was initially to look for a photo location that i’d heard about –  the view looking down Princes Street was taken at that location  – but Calton Hill is very popular and i managed to get some great street photography images. The featured photograph at the top of this post was taken just a few footsteps from the viewing area looking down Princes Street.

The photographs in this gallery form part of the Scotland: Lowlands, Highlands and Islands project.

My 2015 Edinburgh photography called ‘The Two Towns’ can be found HERE

From the Archive: Salthouse Couple

By |2018-03-15T23:18:10+00:00March 16th, 2018|Categories: The Test Strip Photoblog|Tags: , , , , , , |

Another photo from the archive… and yet another image of a couple.

This image was shot in Norfolk near Salthouse, a small village on the North Norfolk Coast around 2008. I was parked in the car park near to the beach and saw this couple, just as i was about to tuck into some fish n’ chips. Sadly the car park no longer exists due to coastal erosion. Gone too is the large pebble sea defence the couple are standing on. Both were claimed back by the sea within the last few years.

The two postures, her intent concentration on using her mobile phone and his gaze out to sea, combined with the line of the sea defence banking compliment, and yet contradict, each other nicely. The lady was distracted by the phone and yet the man was obviously more interested in the seascape before him. Maybe the image says something about how easily we can be distracted by technology or our surroundings  –  the prevalence of the smart phone in recent years has only made the distraction even worse.

Around three images were shot on the Nikon D2H before they moved position – the text message read or answered.

This image is part of the Norfolk project that can be found HERE

Richard Flint Photography
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